Lesson Plans

Use the lesson plans to assist you as you prepare World, US or Kansas History instructional units.

Brown v. Board: What is Equality? (High School / US History)

Creator:
Bruce Gunter
Frankfort High School
Frankfort, Kansas

Topic:
US & World History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
The goal of this unit is for the students to become armed with the information it takes for them to soundly analyze the impact of the black struggle for equality in the U.S.  This includes a review of the events that made the Civil Rights Movement in the 40’s-60’s necessary and the impact of certain regions, groups and individuals on this movement.  Also, the impact these individuals can have on each other and, as leaders, on the people within the movement and those opposed to it.  The students will be exposed to situations that will help them define the term injustice and open their eyes to the feelings it created in those with inferior status.  Mostly, I want the students to understand the term equality is not a static thing.  It differs within an individuals own mind depending on the time and circumstance.  They will define the term as it applies to a citizen of the United States and the race/ ethnic and gender issues that have been our past and will be our future.  They will also understand that a group of individuals with a common goal and a lot of perseverance and courage can make a very distinct difference in the culture and laws of a city, state and country.

Civil Rights and Education (Middle School / Kansas & US History)

Creator:
Jeremy Neuenschwander
Iola Middle School
Iola, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas & US History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
In this unit a variety of topics and disciplines will be covered relating to civil rights in America from 1850 to present.  Important events that will be covered include Dred Scott, The Gettysburg Address, 13th,14th, and 15th amendments, Plessey v. Ferguson, Jim Crow Laws, Brown v. BOE, Civil Rights movements of the 60’s, and finally Martin Luther King and his “I have a dream” speech.  A thorough discussion of the progression of civil rights

Civil Rights and Liberties (High School / US History)

Creator:
Sean Murphy
Leavenworth High School
Leavenworth, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
This unit is designed to enable the learner to connect the events within the various stages of the civil rights movement with the development of landmark court cases in order to demonstrate and recognize that a nation’s values are embodied in the actions of its population and in its legislation.

Students will implement research strategies in order to understand and empathize with the on-going problems of racism and prejudice within our nation. Loosely based on Grant Stiggins model of assessment, students will be given the task of taking all that they have learned and applying that knowledge in a collection of performance driven tasks designed to engage the student on a multiple levels within Bloom’s taxonomy.

This assessment requires students to analyze primary and secondary source material. Additionally, students will express themselves through power-point presentation and an annotated bibliography their understanding of the many levels of on-going civil rights struggles in our nation at the local, state, and federal level within multiple ethnic groups.

Civil Rights and the Brown vs. Board of Education Decision of 1954 (Middle School / Kansas and US History)

Creator:
John Seal
Parsons High School
Parsons, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas & US History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
Students will begin learning more about the background of American racism, including some of its origins, locations, types and possible solutions. The unit is designed for middle school and high school students.”

Civil Rights: the Establishment, the Removal and the Achievement (High School / US History)

Creator:
TJ Warsnak
Halstead High School
Halstead, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
This unit is based on the Kansas History, Government and Economics Standards and is meant to be integrated into a US history class. This unit can be used in many different ways but is best incorporated after students have studied US History through World War II. Background knowledge on history from 1865 to 1945 is important for this unit. It is also helpful if the students have had the opportunity to use primary source documents since such resources are used through out this unit. The main goals of the unit are for:

1. Students to understand what civil rights are and that they apply to all citizens of the United States.
2. Students can explain how civil rights have or have not been applied to different groups at different times through out our history.
3. Students can evaluate different methods that groups or individuals have used to try and achieve civil rights in our history.

Erosion of Separate but Equal (High School / US & World History)

Creator:
Dave Kirkendall
Stafford High School
Stafford, Kansas

Topic:
US & World History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
The goal of this unit is to inform the student of the different court cases that helped shape the Brown v. BOE ruling. The students will gain an understanding of those different cases and of the court’s reasoning in their decisions. Student will compare and contrast the legal definitions in the cases and create graphic organizers to plot out the information gained from each case.

It is hoped that student will see that there were several cases that helped to chip away at the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling and that the Brown decision was not an over night ruling.

Additional information needed will be outlines of the following cases:
Dred Scott v. Sanford
Plessy v. Ferguson
State of Missouri ex Rel Gaines v. Canada
Sweatt V. Painter
Mcluaurin V. Oklahoma State Regents
Brown v. Board of Education Topeka, Kansas

A quick internet search will give the teacher all of the details of the different cases from different sources. Students could be assigned this task as part of the assignment. There are many more cases that can be used in substitution of the ones I have listed.

Everyday Segregation (Middle School / Kansas & US History)

Creator:
Nathan McAlister
Royal Valley Middle School
Mayetta, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
Segregation dominated the lives of blacks in the United States for many decades.  Segregation existed on many levels.  Most students have a basic knowledge of Brown v. BOE, but few realize that segregation also existed in theaters, hotels, barbershops, etc.  This segregation not only caused inconveniences, but disrupted the most basic of activities such as going to the local service station to get your tire changed.  This lesson will alternatively demonstrate to the students the adaptability of African Americans living under the heel of segregation.  For children living under Jim Crow the learning curve was extremely short.  Children were taught where they could go to get ice cream, riding the public bus, or simply going for a swim at the park.  Within this lesson your students will experience everyday segregation on many levels.  This lesson will use experiential learning to get the students involved and then keep their attention through discussion, analysis of primary sources, and critical evaluation of real world problems.  Finally your students will be asked to take all that they have learned and apply that knowledge in a performance task that is the basis for the entire lesson.  Loosely based on Grant Stiggins model of assessment the students will be given 3 different options for assessment.  These assessments are designed to engage the students on a personal level and help them empathize with children 50+ years ago who lived under the yoke of Jim Crow and its painful stigma.

Harlem Renaissance (High School / US History)

Creator:
Jim Robb
Hilsboro High School

Hillsboro, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
This unit is designed to encourage research and self directed learning in the area of Black History, specifically the Harlem Renaissance and it’s contributions to Black identity, Black expression, and change in American society.

Students will create a portfolio showing the results of their research. This portfolio could be traditional (notebook; paper and pencil), or a cyber portfolio (web site).

Implications of the Civil Rights Movement (Middle School / Kansas and US History)

Creator:
Andrea Seifkes
Prairie Hills Middle School
Buhler, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas and US History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
Students will be appointed to a task force by the Kansas State Historical Society Board of Directors. They will use the anniversary of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education to educate and raise community awareness of the Civil Rights Movement. Based on what the students learn, they will address one issue facing Kansas today in the area of Civil Rights and report back to the Board.

This performance assessment will include a written product and an oral presentation. The unit is directly correlated with State Social Studies Standards and meets the curriculum goals of our district as well as one of our building goals.

Life of an Exoduster: Journey Through Time (Middle School / Kansas & US History)

Creator:
Julie Friesen
Kansas City, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
This unit is designed for teaching students about what life was like after Reconstruction for former slaves of the South. Students will learn about the the “Exoduster” movement to discover what it was, when it took place, why it took place and to examine the struggles, hardships, successes of leaving the South and finding a new life in Kansas, “land of John Brown”. Students will use graphic organizers, learn vocabulary, examine advertisements of the time period, and study the “colonies” that were formed in Kansas from the “Exoduster” movement. Students will create a final project from their learning by creating a multimedia presentation of their life of an “exoduster” to demonstrate their understanding. The research information and pictures for this unit were taken from two resources:

Athearn, Robert G. In Search of Canaan: Black Migration to Kansas, 1879-1880. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1978.
Painter, Nell Irvin. Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas After Reconstruction. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977.

Race and the Mass Media (High School / US & World History)

Creator:
Dave Kirkendall
Stafford High School

Katie Minks
Stafford Middle School

Stafford, Kansas

Topic:
US & World History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
This lesson provides an opportunity to discuss the concept of race and its artificial construct in a historical setting. The discussion will focus on how the media’s portrayal of racism has changed over time and how the media can manipulate public perceptions of race.

Social Change in the United States (High School / US History)

Creator:
Don Gifford
Washburn Rural High School
Topeka, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
The unit is intended to give the students an awareness of the factors and institutions that influence social change in America and how social change takes place. Students select a significant social issue whose roots are in the 18th century and follow the progress of that movement into the 21st century. This unit will utilize individual instruction, research, cooperative learning strategies, and assessments.

Steal Away Home (Middle School / Kansas & US History)

Creator:
Andrea Seifkes
Prairie Hills Middle School
Buhler, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
You have recently read and studied the book Steal Away Home in your Language Arts class. In the book, the main character, Dana Shannon, discovers a full skeleton sealed away in a little hidden room in the nineteenth century house her family is restoring. The aged bones date back to just before the Civil War, when pro- and anti-slavery groups transformed the Kansas Territory into the battleground known as Bleeding Kansas. Dana and her friends unravel the secrets of the skeleton as they study the past and learn about themselves as well. Dana’s good friend, Jeep, is an African American teen that learns about some of the struggles some of his ancestors may have faced. At first Jeep is angry learning about the fight for slaves to become free. He then comes to realize that learning more about the past will give him a better appreciation of the rights he enjoys today. Segregation in our country traces its roots to slavery. Your task is to educate your classmates and raise personal awareness of the Civil Rights Movement. Based on what you have learned in class and a personal interview you will create web pages focusing on a brief history of the Civil Rights movement and the impact on individuals.

The African American Experience: A Journey In Civil Rights (High School / US, Kansas & World History, Economics)

Creator:
TJ Warsnak
Halstead High School
Halstead, Kansas

Topic:
US, Kansas & World History, Economics

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
The Civil Rights Movement is one of the most important aspects of US History. The movement does not focus on one group of people or peoples. It involves all Americans and should be well known by all Americans. Furthermore, the Civil Rights movement is not only part of the past. It is a continuing journey that is still being defined. Its relevance can not be understated. This project is meant to guide students through the journey of civil rights by focusing on one group of people who went from the complete absence of civil rights, to the process of gaining civil rights and then what the future should hold for all Americans.

By making this study students will look at the rise of the institution of slavery, emancipation through the civil war, the granting and subsequent restrictions of rights, through the re-establishment of civil rights.

Students will be expected to not only learn the material but also apply the material to make persuasive argument on the topic and apply the information to current societal issues.

A secondary part of the project will address the role of Kansas in the Civil Rights Movement. Students will draw comparisons between National Civil Rights Events and events in Kansas.
 

The American Civil Rights Movement (High School / US History and US Government)

Creator:
Jim Robb
Hilsboro High School

Hillsboro, Kansas

Topic:
US History and US Government

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
This unit is to explore the background and development of the civil rights movement in America. We will explore the chronological history of the United States looking at events that promoted a segregated society and those events that evidenced a resistance to a segregated/unequal society. By looking at these events, students, with teacher help, will draw conclusions about the patterns of society and the effects of years of segregation.

After establishing that a systematic racism pervaded our system, we will research and discuss particular events and people that led to the legal challenge to the Supreme Court decision, “Plessey v. Ferguson”. We will examine the role of the NAACP and their legal staff in leading up to Brown v. Board.

We will examine other key events such as the Little Rock Crisis, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Civil Rights Acts, the 14th, 15th, and 24th amendments, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The students will research, present, and answer questions on events that led to the white reaction and the resistance to the movement.

Students will speculate in a discussion format about the future of racial and economic America. The students will be tested on content. The performance assessment requires students to write a research/conclusion piece evaluating the impact of Brown v. Board on American society.

The Difference Between Black and White: The Continuing Struggle for Equality (High School / US History)

Creator:
Lori Flippin
Lawrence High School
Lawrence, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
High School

 

Abstract:
By investigating the complexities of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the students will become aware of the struggle for racial equality throughout this nation. They will bear witness to the realization that the Civil Rights Movement has a historical significance, is a continual struggle, and ultimately, impacts all Americans. Students will incorporate a vast array of methodology as they explore the Supreme Court Decision in Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, AR, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and various individuals that impacted the numerous Civil Rights marches, sit-ins, and protests. Students will implement research strategies as they analyze primary and secondary source materials and fulfill the assignment obligations. The assessment requires students to complete three (3) of the boxes on the TIC TAC TOE assignment sheet, either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. They will then share their activities with the class, create an all-school display of the Civil Rights Movement, culminating with a self-evaluation and reflective journal entry.

The Road to Brown (Middle School / Kansas & US History)

Creator:
Nathan McAlister
Royal Valley Middle School
Mayetta, Kansas

Topic:
Kansas & US History

Grade:
Middle School

 

Abstract:
In this unit, students will examine the various legal and political changes that occurred as individuals and groups challenged segregation in the United States from the mid 1890’s through the 1950’s.  Key chapters of this legal battle include: Plessy v. Ferguson, Jim Crow laws, the foundation of the NAACP, and Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka.  Students will conduct research, construct and narrate a visual timeline, and construct a graphic representation of Topeka’s key sites.  The performance assessment requires students to write a letter to the past superintendent of Topeka Public Schools discussing their opinions of segregation.  Students will also choose from several writing options as their performance assessment for the unit.

Would You Survive as a Slave? (Middle School / US History)

Creator:
Karen Blasi
Pratt Middle School

Pratt, Kansas

Topic:
US History

Grade:
Middle School

Abstract:
This unit examines the day-to-day challenges, struggles and injustices that slaves faced in the United States through the use of writing projects, the study of primary sources and fiction.